NCGA Golf

Spring 2018

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A R O U N D T H E N C G A 68 SPRING 2018 | NCGA.ORG T he USGA and The R&A unveiled in February key features of the proposed new World Handicap System (WHS), designed to provide all golfers with a consistent measure of playing ability globally. Among the features of the new system, to go into effect in 2020, are: • Flexibility in formats of play, allowing both competitive and recreational rounds to count for handicap purposes and ensuring that a golfer's handicap is more reflective of potential ability • A minimal number of scores needed to obtain a new handicap; a recommendation that the number of scores needed to obtain a new handicap be 54 holes from any combination of 18- hole and 9-hole rounds, but with some discretion available for handicapping authorities or national associations to set a different minimum within their own jurisdiction • A consistent handicap that is portable from course to course and country to country through worldwide use of the USGA Course and Slope Rating System, already successfully used in more than 80 countries • A calculation that considers the impact that abnormal course and weather conditions might have on a player's performance each day • A limit of Net Double Bogey on the maximum hole score (for handicapping purposes only) • A maximum handicap limit of 54.0, regardless of gender, to encourage more golfers to measure and track their performance to increase their enjoyment of the game Why the changes? "For some time, we've heard golfers say, 'I'm not good enough to have a handicap,' or 'I don't play enough to have a handicap.' We want to make the right decisions now to encourage a more welcoming and social game," USGA CEO Mike Davis said. "We're excited to be taking another important step – along with modernizing golf's Rules – to provide a pathway into the sport, making golf easier to understand and more approachable and enjoyable for everyone to play." The tenets of the new system focus on three main objectives: to encourage as many golfers as possible to obtain and maintain a handicap; to enable golfers of differing abilities, genders and nationalities to transport their handicap to any course globally and compete on a fair and equitable basis; and to indicate with sufficient accuracy the score a golfer is reasonably capable of achieving on any course around the world, playing under normal conditions. To learn more, please visit ncga.org/world-handicap-system. New World Handicap System Set for 2020 Debut

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